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I have a Dell server running Windows Server 2003 R2.  There is a single physical drive partitioned as 'C' (12Gb) and 'D' (327Gb).  We have less than 1Mb space left on the 'C' partition.  There is space available on the 'D' partition.  Is there a reliable way to increase the 'C' partition space?

Thank you in advance.

asked 12/13/2011 03:04

AielloJ's gravatar image

AielloJ ♦♦


12 Answers:
Clean up the C: drive.  12 GB is more than enough space if managed apprpriately.  See: http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/static/bootdrivesize.asp
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answered

leew's gravatar image

leew

Have already cleaned everything possible.  There are some applications that can not be uninstalled.  I really need to resize the partition.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:11:01

AielloJ's gravatar image

AielloJ

A couple of ways:

1. Move the paging file from C: to D:.
2. Move user profiles from C: to D:.
3. Delete temp files.
4. Set user profiles to clear the internet cache on exit (if you choose to not move user profiles).
5. Delete unneeded user profiles.
6. Install software into D:\Program Files instead of C:\Program Files.
7. Increase the size of the C: drive using a repartitioning tool such as those from WWW dot EASEUS dot COM as 12 GB is far too small considering patch activities from Microsoft.
8. Delete Patch Uninstall directories from C:\Windows.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:12:41

WalkaboutTigger's gravatar image

WalkaboutTigger

Wow - and you read my link which includes 20+ things to do in just a few seconds?  I'm impressed.  Resizing a partition has the potential to render the server's disk corrupt.  I advise avoiding it.  What is taking up the space?  If you don't know, try WinDirStat..  Odds are even your "unmovable" apps can be moved if you stop their services and create a junction, mapping a drive to their folder and putting the folder on another disk (if you aren't sure what I'm talking about, read my link then ask and I'll be happy to clarify.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:14:50

leew's gravatar image

leew

leew:

Yes, I did.  I've ready it before in depth.  It is a very good article, but simply scanning sections 3 and 4 in the index, I know we are not running any of those services and I've already done everything in section 4.  I've inherited a system that's a mess and I have 60+ engineers whose ability to work is about to come to a halt.  Help rather than sarcasm would be appreciated.

All:
This is simply a file server, thus no user profiles on this machine.  User profiles are taking up a little more than 1Gb.  Moving them would buy a little space.  There's some small programs that would then be able to be uninstalled.  With the current amount of disk space, I can't even clean out the event logs or undelete some optional programs.  I agree totally with WalkaboutTigger's comment.  After several years of Microsoft OS updates, there's precious little room left on the OS partition.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:18:19

AielloJ's gravatar image

AielloJ

I've found:

1) A little more than 500Mb in the C:\Windows\i386 folder.  Can these be moved or are they part of the running instance of Windows?
2) Same for c:\Windows Driver Cache.  (Approximately 100Mb)
3) I cannot find the \%systemroot%\system32\dllcache folder.
4) I'm assuming the C:\Windows\system32\ReinstallBackups folders can be deleted since the files are all from 2005 and 2006.
5) All space freed up is consumed almost immediately.  Is this due to the Volume Shadow Copy or similar service running?  If so, what can be done?

Thank you in advance.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:35:57

AielloJ's gravatar image

AielloJ

File servers do not require a lot of space.  Have you deleted the the old updates (as I say in the article).  1 GB of profile space is insane.  That shouldn't be more than 250 MB.  Even that would be large.  Sorry, but ESPECIALLY for a simple file server, there is no reason no more space if you clean it up.  Temp files in Windows - c:\Windows\temp - IIS Log files is someone installed IIS. Break it down - I know you don't want to and you probably feel offended by my comments so far, but I felt offended by your dismissal with no explanation other than a generic "Have already cleaned everything possible."

Now that we've insulted each other, if you'd like to continue resolving the issue, please humor me, step back, and elaborate on what is using the space.  A simple file server doesn't have many apps - certainly not large ones - installed.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:55:35

leew's gravatar image

leew

As I said in the article you read - move shadow copies to the other drive (you can't move the existing but you can remove the existing and start making them on the other drive).

If the space is consumed immediately, you have a runaway process - if you use software like WinDirStat you can get some help locating what is filling the drive.

i386 is almost certainly the install source and can be moved to another drive.  (or deleted, but I go conservatively and move rather delete whenever possible).
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answered 2011-12-13 at 11:56:49

leew's gravatar image

leew

leew:

WinDirStat did the trick and I've recovered over 2Gb of space that would otherwise not been found.  How can I list the size of the Volume Shadow Copy and if it warrants it, how do I move it?

AielloJ
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answered 2011-12-13 at 12:00:41

AielloJ's gravatar image

AielloJ

The following is cut and paste from the article you said you read that I had in my first comment (it tells you the size in ghf properties):

 Shadow Copy Data Volume Shadow Copy, the new drive snapshot feature of Windows Server 2003 is a fantastically useful technology. Unfortunately, its settings set the default drive to store the copies on to be the same drive as is monitored. If it's enabled on C: it could be using a significant percentage of your drive for its copies. Worse, someone COULD have configured the service to store data from other drives on C:. In either case, you should move the data off C:. The process is simple, but you will lose all previous copies. For each drive you want to change the Volume Shadow Copy settings for, you must first disable it, then re-enable it. Then, before any copies are created, you must change the path for where they are stored. I often setup a drive for this - a logical partition or if possible it's own spindle or set of spindles for increased performance.

To move the data, go to the properties of any hard drive letter and then go to the Shadow Copies tab. Disable the shadow copies for the C: drive (this will ERASE all previous copies but otherwise not affect the drive). Then, re-enable it on the drive and immediately change the location of where you want to save the copies (make it another partition or disk, preferrably). I usually create a separate partition JUST for Shadow Copy data, though for performance it would be better to use a separate physical disk.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 12:36:01

leew's gravatar image

leew

In case you still consider increasing the size of C: taking space from D: drive then look on Paragon Partition Manager 11 Server.
It did the resizing for me more than 20 times successfully on servers.
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answered 2011-12-13 at 12:54:12

noxcho's gravatar image

noxcho

Shadow copies can be managed for every disk in Disk -> Properties -> Shadow copies (tab). Just disable all shadow copies.
Can you please send the result of WinDirStat / TreeFreeSize? Maybe someone else can help identifying strange sizes in typical root folders.
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answered 2011-12-14 at 01:30:11

CarlosDominguez's gravatar image

CarlosDominguez

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Asked: 12/13/2011 03:04

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Last updated: 12/16/2011 12:47